Stop & Shop Strike Support

31,000 workers at Stop & Shops across Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island are on strike.

Management at Stop & Shop presented their “final offer” to their workers, which included significant cuts to healthcare, massive increases (over 100% in some cases) to workers’ health care premiums, and replacing wage increases with so-called bonuses. All in all, this represents a massive step backwards with many workers facing reduced weekly earnings if they agreed to their “final offer”.

On top of this, Stop & Shop’s parent company reported over $2 billion in profits last year. This is not the time to ask for concessions. Rather, this is a time to invest in the workers who have made Stop & Shop so successful and profitable. 

Here are four ways you can help UFCW workers win a fair contract:

1.    Sign UFCW's petition to Stop & Shop. Click here to sign the petition to Stop & Shop management to let them know you stand with the workers as they fight for a fair contract.

 2.    Join the workers on a picket line. The workers need your help and solidarity as they picket at over 90 stores across CT. Join them whenever you have time and bring them coffee and doughnuts. See below for a list of Western CT Area Labor Federation “adopted” store locations. Chapter leaders will have posters & updated "Solidarity Bucks" on hand, but we encourage you to show up with your union posters, wearing your union clothing, and any prepared chants you have. 

 3.   Continue to shop union. UFCW represents workers at a number of other grocery stores across the state. Click here for a list of union grocery stores in Connecticut. 

4.    Donate to worker strike fund: More details TBD. 

 

“Adopted” store locations to join the picket 

***Please note these locations may change due to store closures. We will keep you up to date of these changes. 

Strike Captain: Victor Sagendorf, 203-560-1751

Co-Captain: Raoul Aquillon, 203-551-1094

 

Strike Captain: Robert Ferrazzolli, 203-414-6214

Co-Captains: Zane Siwanowicz, 203-217-2919, Joylette Harvin, 347-439-9534

 

Strike Captain: Terry McGraffrey, 203-918-3817

Co-Captain: Hector Garcia, 303-570-3707

 

Strike Captain: Denise Tartaglia, 203-843-3858

Co-Captain: Matthew Riggs, 203-623-5768

Strike Captain Mark Sciaretto 203-206-5830

 Co-Captain Gator Brown 203-206-5662

920 Wolcott St Waterbury  

Strike Captain Frank Caldera 203-537-6239.

Co-Captains Leo Carratini 203-819-4203 & Carol Plourde 203-886-8010

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