Stop & Shop Strike Support

31,000 workers at Stop & Shops across Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island are on strike.

Management at Stop & Shop presented their “final offer” to their workers, which included significant cuts to healthcare, massive increases (over 100% in some cases) to workers’ health care premiums, and replacing wage increases with so-called bonuses. All in all, this represents a massive step backwards with many workers facing reduced weekly earnings if they agreed to their “final offer”.

On top of this, Stop & Shop’s parent company reported over $2 billion in profits last year. This is not the time to ask for concessions. Rather, this is a time to invest in the workers who have made Stop & Shop so successful and profitable. 

Here are four ways you can help UFCW workers win a fair contract:

1.    Sign UFCW's petition to Stop & Shop. Click here to sign the petition to Stop & Shop management to let them know you stand with the workers as they fight for a fair contract.

 2.    Join the workers on a picket line. The workers need your help and solidarity as they picket at over 90 stores across CT. Join them whenever you have time and bring them coffee and doughnuts. See below for a list of Western CT Area Labor Federation “adopted” store locations. Chapter leaders will have posters & updated "Solidarity Bucks" on hand, but we encourage you to show up with your union posters, wearing your union clothing, and any prepared chants you have. 

 3.   Continue to shop union. UFCW represents workers at a number of other grocery stores across the state. Click here for a list of union grocery stores in Connecticut. 

4.    Donate to worker strike fund: More details TBD. 

 

“Adopted” store locations to join the picket 

***Please note these locations may change due to store closures. We will keep you up to date of these changes. 

Strike Captain: Victor Sagendorf, 203-560-1751

Co-Captain: Raoul Aquillon, 203-551-1094

 

Strike Captain: Robert Ferrazzolli, 203-414-6214

Co-Captains: Zane Siwanowicz, 203-217-2919, Joylette Harvin, 347-439-9534

 

Strike Captain: Terry McGraffrey, 203-918-3817

Co-Captain: Hector Garcia, 303-570-3707

 

Strike Captain: Denise Tartaglia, 203-843-3858

Co-Captain: Matthew Riggs, 203-623-5768

Strike Captain Mark Sciaretto 203-206-5830

 Co-Captain Gator Brown 203-206-5662

920 Wolcott St Waterbury  

Strike Captain Frank Caldera 203-537-6239.

Co-Captains Leo Carratini 203-819-4203 & Carol Plourde 203-886-8010

On May 7, while recovering from an illness, Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) International President Larry Hanley died suddenly.  In a brief statement, his family,

Patt Moon-Updike wanted to be a nurse since she was 9 years old.

On Feb. 15, just days after massive layoffs at Activision Blizzard, the AFL-CIO issued a powerful public statement of support to game developers in the United States. Its message, published in an open letter at Kotaku, was both simple and profound.

President Donald Trump heads into a midterm referendum on his presidency showing no real progress on a core promise: to raise the wages of America’s “forgotten man and woman.”

Once the impact of inflation is included, ordinary Americans’ hourly earnings are lower than they were a year ago.

One of Washingon’s largest licensed marijuana retailers has inked a union contract to cover 134 workers at five locations, helping it provide employee benefits while navigating the difficult waters of federal law.

Ryan Kunkel, CEO and founder of Have a Heart, said the agreement with the United Food & Commercial Workers union Local 21 solves a problem for the company, which has ambitious plans to grow in a half-dozen other states.

“For better part of 3 years we have been trying to figure out how to provide basic things like health care benefits,” he said in an interview.

Officials in the building trades say their members, who take physically demanding jobs and risk serious injuries that often require pain medication, are uniquely predisposed to addiction.

A federal district judge in Washington struck down most of the key provisions of three executive orders that President Trump signed in late May that would have made it easier to fire federal employees.

We’re bringing you a special episode this week. Last week, Sarah was in New Orleans for Netroots Nation, and this week we bring you the recording of the panel, What’s a Strike and How Can I Help?, designed to explain to labor rookies what goes into planning a strike, building community support, and successfully pulling one off.

Maddin won his case, but it’s Gorsuch’s world we’re living in. According to an AFL-CIO report, 5,190 workers died on the job in the United States in 2016. Another 50,000 to 60,000 die annually of occupational diseases, and nearly 4 million experienced work-related injuries or illnesses.

A law to free nonunion workers from paying union dues has been undone by Missouri voters, a victory for labor organizers who spent millions of dollars to organize a “no” campaign.

“It’s a clear message that they want to go a different way,” said AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka. “They want workers to have a bigger say.”

The Trump administration is considering bypassing Congress to grant a $100 billion tax cut mainly to the wealthy, a legally tenuous maneuver that would cut capital gains taxation and fulfill a long-held ambition of many investors and conservatives.